Super dirt

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

Why is sustainable soil management so vital to our survival?

One of the greatest leaps in our mastery over the natural world as human beings came when we first began planting our own crops about 10,000 years ago. Our ability to grow our own food moved us from a species of nomadic hunter gatherers to a new system of settlement and agriculture which has given rise to division of labour, trading economies, political structures and hierarchical societies. While it’s sometimes tempting to think we may have been better off beforehand, the great part of living in the modern world is that few of us still have to actually bury our hands in the dirt to feed ourselves….

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kLb4jd
via IFTTT

Publicités

Super dirt

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

Why is sustainable soil management so vital to our survival?

One of the greatest leaps in our mastery over the natural world as human beings came when we first began planting our own crops about 10,000 years ago. Our ability to grow our own food moved us from a species of nomadic hunter gatherers to a new system of settlement and agriculture which has given rise to division of labour, trading economies, political structures and hierarchical societies. While it’s sometimes tempting to think we may have been better off beforehand, the great part of living in the modern world is that few of us still have to actually bury our hands in the dirt to feed ourselves….

Food Futures: Developing effective food systems interventions to improve public health nutrition – Agricultural Systems

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

842 million people worldwide are undernourished, while simultaneously the number of overweight and obese individuals increased to 2.1 billion in 2013. There is growing opinion that addressing the global burden of diet-related disease requires a much more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach than stand-alone public health nutrition interventions such as nutrition education or food labelling. Instead, we need to develop whole of systems interventions to address the core problem and consider the way we grow, process, distribute and commercialize our food. However, there is little evidence or guidance on how to best achieve this goal. This research aims to develop a whole of food systems approach for public health nutrition research by building on systems methods from other fields of science. Specific objectives are to: 1) identify systems methods that are applicable to public health nutrition research; 2) identify how these systems methods and public health research can best be integrated. This paper presents why and how systems methods can be used in public health nutrition research. The food system is highly complex and this complexity needs to be acknowledged to find solutions for the current nutrition challenges (obesity, under nutrition), which cannot be solved in isolation. We envision that the methods presented in this paper can form the basis for future research in this area where it can be applied to other public health nutrition research (for example other food products, in relation to specific diseases, different countries) as well as other domains of a sustainable food system not specifically focused on here e.g. economic, social and specific environmental outcomes.

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2jJn874
via IFTTT

Food Futures: Developing effective food systems interventions to improve public health nutrition – Agricultural Systems

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

842 million people worldwide are undernourished, while simultaneously the number of overweight and obese individuals increased to 2.1 billion in 2013. There is growing opinion that addressing the global burden of diet-related disease requires a much more comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach than stand-alone public health nutrition interventions such as nutrition education or food labelling. Instead, we need to develop whole of systems interventions to address the core problem and consider the way we grow, process, distribute and commercialize our food. However, there is little evidence or guidance on how to best achieve this goal. This research aims to develop a whole of food systems approach for public health nutrition research by building on systems methods from other fields of science. Specific objectives are to: 1) identify systems methods that are applicable to public health nutrition research; 2) identify how these systems methods and public health research can best be integrated. This paper presents why and how systems methods can be used in public health nutrition research. The food system is highly complex and this complexity needs to be acknowledged to find solutions for the current nutrition challenges (obesity, under nutrition), which cannot be solved in isolation. We envision that the methods presented in this paper can form the basis for future research in this area where it can be applied to other public health nutrition research (for example other food products, in relation to specific diseases, different countries) as well as other domains of a sustainable food system not specifically focused on here e.g. economic, social and specific environmental outcomes.

How CRISPR is changing the food industry

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

CRISPR is one of the fastest, most precise and impactful methods for genetic engineering the world has ever seen. Monsanto recently acquired the first commercial license of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology from the Broad Institute, making it the first license of the technology for agricultural use. DuPont has been working with Caribou Biosciences for more than a year and is already growing CRISPR-edited corn and wheat plants in field trials. Scientists have been using CRISPR on plants and animals to include mushrooms that don’t brown as quickly in the refrigerator, drought-tolerant corn and virus-resistant pigs.

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kKjV4E
via IFTTT

The Vertical Farm

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

No. 212 Rome Street, in Newark, New Jersey, used to be the address of Grammer, Dempsey & Hudson, a steel-supply company. It was like a lumberyard for steel, which it bought in bulk from distant mills and distributed in smaller amounts, mostly to customers within a hundred-mile radius of Newark. It sold off its assets in 2008 and later shut down. In 2015, a new indoor-agriculture company called AeroFarms leased the property. It had the rusting corrugated-steel exterior torn down and a new building erected on the old frame. Then it filled nearly seventy thousand square feet of floor space with what is called a vertical farm. The building’s ceiling allowed for grow tables to be stacked twelve layers tall, to a height of thirty-six feet, in rows eighty feet long. The vertical farm grows kale, bok choi, watercress, arugula, red-leaf lettuce, mizuna, and other baby salad greens.

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2jJ1jo1
via IFTTT

Data shows most American farms are still family farms | Food Safety News

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

After all these years, agriculture in America remains overwhelmingly dominated by family farms. A new report by USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) shows not only just how dependent America is on family farms, but also how many are independent of government. “Seventy-two percent of all farms received no farm-related government payments in 2015,” according to the report written by USDA’s Robert A. Hoppe and James M. MacDonald. That figure stands in contrast to the many months and even years that every Congress spends on the big “Farm Bill.”

from Tumblr http://ift.tt/2kKtFvZ
via IFTTT

How CRISPR is changing the food industry

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

CRISPR is one of the fastest, most precise and impactful methods for genetic engineering the world has ever seen. Monsanto recently acquired the first commercial license of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology from the Broad Institute, making it the first license of the technology for agricultural use. DuPont has been working with Caribou Biosciences for more than a year and is already growing CRISPR-edited corn and wheat plants in field trials. Scientists have been using CRISPR on plants and animals to include mushrooms that don’t brown as quickly in the refrigerator, drought-tolerant corn and virus-resistant pigs.

The Vertical Farm

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

No. 212 Rome Street, in Newark, New Jersey, used to be the address of Grammer, Dempsey & Hudson, a steel-supply company. It was like a lumberyard for steel, which it bought in bulk from distant mills and distributed in smaller amounts, mostly to customers within a hundred-mile radius of Newark. It sold off its assets in 2008 and later shut down. In 2015, a new indoor-agriculture company called AeroFarms leased the property. It had the rusting corrugated-steel exterior torn down and a new building erected on the old frame. Then it filled nearly seventy thousand square feet of floor space with what is called a vertical farm. The building’s ceiling allowed for grow tables to be stacked twelve layers tall, to a height of thirty-six feet, in rows eighty feet long. The vertical farm grows kale, bok choi, watercress, arugula, red-leaf lettuce, mizuna, and other baby salad greens.

Data shows most American farms are still family farms | Food Safety News

See on Scoop.itVeille Scientifique Agroalimentaire – Agronomie

After all these years, agriculture in America remains overwhelmingly dominated by family farms. A new report by USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) shows not only just how dependent America is on family farms, but also how many are independent of government. “Seventy-two percent of all farms received no farm-related government payments in 2015,” according to the report written by USDA’s Robert A. Hoppe and James M. MacDonald. That figure stands in contrast to the many months and even years that every Congress spends on the big “Farm Bill.”