Insects as food? It will need careful marketing, says Canadean

Insects are predicted by many to be the superfood of tomorrow and are already popular in fine dining or as a novelty among more adventurous consumers, according to market researcher Canadean. But will they be able to move beyond a foodie fad and be embraced by the average consumer?

The European Union thinks so: it has offered member states US $3 million to research the use of insects in cooking, the company points out. Similarly, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has published a list of almost 2000 edible insect species. With 40 tonnes of insects for every human on earth, insects are an abundant, sustainable food source that is rich in protein, iron and calcium and low in fat and cholesterol. However, they may prove a hard sell among more squeamish consumers. According to Canadean’s survey, 65% of consumers say that they would not be willing to try foods made from processed insects.

 

Source: ingredientsnetwork.com

See on Scoop.itAgroSup Dijon Veille Scientifique AgroAlimentaire – Agronomie

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Insects as food? It will need careful marketing, says Canadean

See on Scoop.itAgroSup Dijon Veille Scientifique AgroAlimentaire – Agronomie

Insects are predicted by many to be the superfood of tomorrow and are already popular in fine dining or as a novelty among more adventurous consumers, according to market researcher Canadean. But will they be able to move beyond a foodie fad and be embraced by the average consumer?

The European Union thinks so: it has offered member states US $3 million to research the use of insects in cooking, the company points out. Similarly, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organisation has published a list of almost 2000 edible insect species. With 40 tonnes of insects for every human on earth, insects are an abundant, sustainable food source that is rich in protein, iron and calcium and low in fat and cholesterol. However, they may prove a hard sell among more squeamish consumers. According to Canadean’s survey, 65% of consumers say that they would not be willing to try foods made from processed insects.

 
See on ingredientsnetwork.com

Rapport sur le développement humain 2014 | PNUD

Le présent Rapport développe deux propositions de base.

La première est que la vulnérabilité des personnes est considérablement influencée par leurs capabilités et la société dans laquelle elles vivent. L’autre suggère que l’échec à protéger les personnes contre la vulnérabilité est principalement dû à des politiques inadaptées et à des institutions sociales de mauvaise qualité, voire dysfonctionnelles.

 

Les deux thèses centrales du présent Rapport sont basées sur l’idée que

1. l’amélioration et la protection durable des choix individuels, des capabilités et des compétences sociales sont essentielles ; et que

2. les stratégies et les politiques de développement humain doivent viser à réduire la vulnérabilité et à renforcer la résilience.

 

Une meilleure compréhension de la vulnérabilité et de la résilience du point de vue du développement humain permet d’analyser plus profondément les facteurs et les politiques qui expliquent pourquoi certains individus, certaines communautés ou certains pays sont plus résilients aux événements défavorables et y répondent mieux.

 

A retenir:

– Près de 80 pour cent de la population mondiale n’a pas accès à une protection sociale complète.

– Plus de 2 milliards de personnes vivent dans une situation de pauvreté multidimensionnelle.

– À l’échelle mondiale, le niveau de développement des femmes est de 8% inférieur à celui des hommes.

– L’Afrique sub-saharienne enregistre les plus hauts niveaux d’inégalité selon le rapport.

– Malgré les progrès effectués, l’Amérique latine et les Caraïbes continuent d’enregistrer les plus fortes inégalités de revenus.

– Les pays les plus égalitaires sont la Finlande, la Norvège, la République Tchèque et l’Islande selon le rapport.

Source: www.undp.org

See on Scoop.itAgroSup Dijon Veille Scientifique AgroAlimentaire – Agronomie

Rapport sur le développement humain 2014 | PNUD

See on Scoop.itAgroSup Dijon Veille Scientifique AgroAlimentaire – Agronomie

Le présent Rapport développe deux propositions de base.

La première est que la vulnérabilité des personnes est considérablement influencée par leurs capabilités et la société dans laquelle elles vivent. L’autre suggère que l’échec à protéger les personnes contre la vulnérabilité est principalement dû à des politiques inadaptées et à des institutions sociales de mauvaise qualité, voire dysfonctionnelles.

Les deux thèses centrales du présent Rapport sont basées sur l’idée que

1. l’amélioration et la protection durable des choix individuels, des capabilités et des compétences sociales sont essentielles ; et que

2. les stratégies et les politiques de développement humain doivent viser à réduire la vulnérabilité et à renforcer la résilience.

Une meilleure compréhension de la vulnérabilité et de la résilience du point de vue du développement humain permet d’analyser plus profondément les facteurs et les politiques qui expliquent pourquoi certains individus, certaines communautés ou certains pays sont plus résilients aux événements défavorables et y répondent mieux.

A retenir:

– Près de 80 pour cent de la population mondiale n’a pas accès à une protection sociale complète.

– Plus de 2 milliards de personnes vivent dans une situation de pauvreté multidimensionnelle.

– À l’échelle mondiale, le niveau de développement des femmes est de 8% inférieur à celui des hommes.

– L’Afrique sub-saharienne enregistre les plus hauts niveaux d’inégalité selon le rapport.

– Malgré les progrès effectués, l’Amérique latine et les Caraïbes continuent d’enregistrer les plus fortes inégalités de revenus.

– Les pays les plus égalitaires sont la Finlande, la Norvège, la République Tchèque et l’Islande selon le rapport.

See on undp.org

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that engineered probiotic bacteria (“friendly” bacteria like those in yogurt) in the gut produce a therapeutic compound that inhibits weight gain, insulin resistance, and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice.

 

“Of course it’s hard to speculate from mouse to human,” said senior investigator Sean Davies, Ph.D., assistant professor of Pharmacology. “But essentially, we’ve prevented most of the negative consequences of obesity in mice, even though they’re eating a high-fat diet.”

 

The findings published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation (open access) suggest that it may be possible to manipulate the bacterial residents of the gut — the gut microbiota — to treat obesity and other chronic diseases.

 

Davies has a long-standing interest in using probiotic bacteria to deliver drugs to the gut in a sustained manner, in order to eliminate the daily drug regimens associated with chronic diseases. In 2007, he received a National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award to develop and test the idea.

 

Other studies have demonstrated that the natural gut microbiota plays a role in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “The types of bacteria you have in your gut influence your risk for chronic diseases,” Davies said. “We wondered if we could manipulate the gut microbiota in a way that would promote health.”

 

To start, the team needed a safe bacterial strain that colonizes the human gut. They selected E. coli Nissle 1917, which has been used as a probiotic treatment for diarrhea since its discovery nearly 100 years ago.

 

They genetically modified the E. coli Nissle strain to produce a lipid compound called N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)*, which is normally synthesized in the small intestine in response to feeding. NAPE is rapidly converted to NAE, a compound that reduces both food intake and weight gain. Some evidence suggests that NAPE production may be reduced in individuals eating a high-fat diet.

 

“NAPE seemed like a great compound to try — since it’s something that the host normally produces,” Davies said.

 

The investigators added the NAPE-producing bacteria to the drinking water of mice eating a high-fat diet for eight weeks. Mice that received the modified bacteria had dramatically lower food intake, body fat, insulin resistance and fatty liver compared to mice receiving control bacteria.

 

They found that these protective effects persisted for at least four weeks after the NAPE-producing bacteria were removed from the drinking water. And even 12 weeks after the modified bacteria were removed, the treated mice still had much lower body weight and body fat compared to the control mice. Active bacteria no longer persisted after about six weeks.

Source: www.kurzweilai.net

A vos commentaires…  PAM

See on Scoop.itAgroSup Dijon Veille Scientifique AgroAlimentaire – Agronomie

Study suggests probiotics could prevent obesity and insulin resistance

See on Scoop.itAgroSup Dijon Veille Scientifique AgroAlimentaire – Agronomie

Vanderbilt University researchers have discovered that engineered probiotic bacteria (“friendly” bacteria like those in yogurt) in the gut produce a therapeutic compound that inhibits weight gain, insulin resistance, and other adverse effects of a high-fat diet in mice.

“Of course it’s hard to speculate from mouse to human,” said senior investigator Sean Davies, Ph.D., assistant professor of Pharmacology. “But essentially, we’ve prevented most of the negative consequences of obesity in mice, even though they’re eating a high-fat diet.”

The findings published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation (open access) suggest that it may be possible to manipulate the bacterial residents of the gut — the gut microbiota — to treat obesity and other chronic diseases.

Davies has a long-standing interest in using probiotic bacteria to deliver drugs to the gut in a sustained manner, in order to eliminate the daily drug regimens associated with chronic diseases. In 2007, he received a National Institutes of Health Director’s New Innovator Award to develop and test the idea.

Other studies have demonstrated that the natural gut microbiota plays a role in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. “The types of bacteria you have in your gut influence your risk for chronic diseases,” Davies said. “We wondered if we could manipulate the gut microbiota in a way that would promote health.”

To start, the team needed a safe bacterial strain that colonizes the human gut. They selected E. coli Nissle 1917, which has been used as a probiotic treatment for diarrhea since its discovery nearly 100 years ago.

They genetically modified the E. coli Nissle strain to produce a lipid compound called N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)*, which is normally synthesized in the small intestine in response to feeding. NAPE is rapidly converted to NAE, a compound that reduces both food intake and weight gain. Some evidence suggests that NAPE production may be reduced in individuals eating a high-fat diet.

“NAPE seemed like a great compound to try — since it’s something that the host normally produces,” Davies said.

The investigators added the NAPE-producing bacteria to the drinking water of mice eating a high-fat diet for eight weeks. Mice that received the modified bacteria had dramatically lower food intake, body fat, insulin resistance and fatty liver compared to mice receiving control bacteria.

They found that these protective effects persisted for at least four weeks after the NAPE-producing bacteria were removed from the drinking water. And even 12 weeks after the modified bacteria were removed, the treated mice still had much lower body weight and body fat compared to the control mice. Active bacteria no longer persisted after about six weeks.

Pierre-André Marechal’s insight:

A vos commentaires…  PAM

See on kurzweilai.net